Mentors

Our mentors make up an extremely impressive team. They have been carefully selected for their ability to engage with developing writers on an ongoing level. Together they have written numerous books, taught at prestigious universities, worked for leading literary agencies, and more…

We pride ourselves on finding the right mentor for you to work with. We will fully discuss your preferences and needs at the outset of the course, hopefully together finding the ideal match. Please see below for more information about our mentors.

Sarah Bower

Sarah Bower is the author of two historical novels, The Needle in the Blood (Susan Hill’s Novel of the Year 2007) and The Book of Love. She has also published short stories in a number of literary magazines including QWF, Spiked and The Yellow Room. She has an MA in Creative Writing from the University of East Anglia and was shortlisted for the Curtis Brown scholarship for 2001/2002. She teaches creative writing at UEA and for the Open University. She edited The Historical Novels Review for two years and remains a regular contributor to the magazine and its sister publication, Solander.
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Su Box

Su Box specialises in children’s books (fiction and non-fiction). She spent many years as an editor and commissioning editor for both mass-market and smaller independent publishers before taking up a freelance career. As well as editing the work of established children’s authors, she is experienced in assessing manuscripts and ‘nurturing’ new writers. She has also written more than 30 books for younger children, including You Are Very Special (still in print after more than 12 years) and The First Rainbow.
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Tom Bromley

Tom Bromley has been working in publishing for over ten years, including five years as a commissioning editor for both Little, Brown and Anova Books. He is the author of eight books: the novels Crazy Little Thing Called Love and Half A World Away (Pan Macmillan), We Could Have Been the Wombles (Penguin), The Encyclopedia of Guilty Pleasures and Shopping While Drunk (John Murray); Rock and Pop Elevens (Michael O’Mara) and two ghostwritten works.

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Stephen Carver

Stephen Carver is a writer and academic. He is the co-director of Green Door Designs, a graphic design company specialising in book layout and cover design, and until recently he taught creative writing for the University of East Anglia. Steve holds a Ph.D in English literature from UEA, where he also taught from 1994 to 2002, before taking up an associate-professorship in English literature at the University of Fukui, Japan. He returned to the UK in 2005, lecturing in critical theory and running an award winning student study skills service at the Norwich School of Art and Design until 2010, when he returned to UEA. He specialises in Victorian literature, Life Writing, Historical and Genre Fiction, Narratology, and the Gothic, and has been the recipient of several national and international research awards, most notably two from the Arts and Humanities Research Council of Great Britain. His biography of the Victorian novelist William Harrison Ainsworth, The Life and Works of the Lancashire Novelist, was published by Mellen in 2003, and he has also published extensively on literature, film, and comics, most recently contributing essays to the Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of the Gothic, and The Works of Tim Burton: Margins to Mainstream(Palgrave MacMillan 2013). He has published short fiction inCascandoNot NotBirdsuit, and Veto, and is the founder of the ‘Bushy Park’ online writers’ group. He is presently running a new programme of online creative writing courses for the Unthank School of Writing, a subsidiary of the independent publishing group Unthank Books, and taking a year out from academia to edit the Jack Vincent papers. Steve is married to the graphic designer Gracie Carver, and the couple live in Norfolk with their young son, a cat called Sid, and three classic motorcycles. You can read his blog here and read more about Unthank here. The Bushy Park Writers have a Facebook group here.
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Tim Clare

Tim Clare is a writer, stand-up poet and musician, who performs all over the UK. His book about thwarted ambition, We Can’t All Be Astronauts, is published by Ebury Press. He has written for the Guardian and The Times, presented the Channel 4 series How To Get A Book Deal, and has appeared on Radio 1 and 2. He’s performed at many festivals including Glastonbury, Leeds and Reading, and Latitude.
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Rose Gaete

Rose Gaete is a freelance editor. She has extensive editorial experience including several years working as an agent at the Wylie Agency where she was responsible for nurturing, advising and editing first time writers before submitting their work to publishers. Now she works for a variety of publishers, agents and literary scouts, including HarperCollins and Bloomsbury, as a reader and editor, as well as working independently to advise unpublished writers on their work. She has an MA in English Literature from Cambridge University and specializes in contemporary fiction. She lives in London and has three young children.
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Sara Maitland

Sara Maitland is a writer of considerable stature. Her first novel, Daughter of Jerusalem (1978), won the Somerset Maugham Award, and her fifth, Home Truths (1992) was shortlisted for the Scottish Writer of the Year Award. She has also published four collections of short stories – one story, A Fall from Grace, is anthologised in The Penguin Book of Modern Women’s Short Stories, (Penguin 1990). On Becoming a Fairy Godmother and a collection of short stories have been published by Maia Press.
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Jane McNulty

Jane McNulty has been a freelance television scriptwriter since 2000, with screen credits for episodes of various long running series including EastEnders, Doctors, Crossroads, Heartbeat and Peak Practice. She was also commissioned to write a short film for BBC2. She has taught at several universities (prose and scriptwriting) and currently lectures at Manchester Metropolitan University and on the MA in Scriptwriting at the University of Salford. Jane is also a reader for NAWE and runs courses and workshops throughout the north west of England and Scotland. For four years she was a senior creative writing tutor for the Open College of the Arts. She has over fifteen years’ experience of teaching creative writing to adults and children including by distance learning through The Writers’ Ark, a web-based co-operative of published and broadcast writer/tutors. Her award-winning dramatic monologues, short stories and poems appear in various anthologies.
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Miranda Miller

Miranda Miller’s seventh novel, The Fairy Visions of Richard Dadd, was published by Peter Owen in 2013 and is part 2 of her Bedlam Trilogy. She has also published a book of short stories about expatriate life in Saudi Arabia and  a book of interviews with homeless women and politicians. Hilary Mantel said of her work, ” Miller’s intricate fictions are lit by the dark flicker of a strong and original imagination.” She has been a TLC mentor for six years and is a Royal Literary Fund Fellow at the Courtauld Institute.
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Antonia Parkin

Antonia Parkin has worked for several years as a children’s book editor at Frances Lincoln Publishers. She has a wide range of expertise covering poetry, story books and fiction and non-fiction picture books. She is also a freelance writer of educational books for children and a translator. Among her recent publications are translations of Jacques Duquennoy’s award-winning French picture books Ghost Party and Loch Ness Ghosts. She lives on the Wirral with her family.
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Meg Peacocke

Meg Peacocke has written poetry throughout her long life, beginning her career twenty five years ago with Peterloo Poets. They have now produced four collections of her work. In 2005 she received a Cholmondeley Award “for distinction in poetry”. Meg’s writing is much influenced by music and the visual arts. Her life is a rural one, and she greatly enjoys one-to-one tuition and mentoring.
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Ray Robinson

Ray Robinson first won attention in 2006 with his debut novel, Electricity (Picador, 2006). It was shortlisted for both the James Tait Black Memorial Prize, and the Authors’ Club First Novel Award. The feature film of Electricity, starring Agyness Deyn as Lily, will be released in the summer of 2014. Robinson’s other novels are The Man Without (Picador, 2008), Forgetting Zoe (Heinemann, 2010), and Jawbone Lake (Heinemann, 2014). Forgetting Zoe was selected for the inaugural Fiction Uncovered promotion and was the Observer’s ‘Thriller of the Month’. Robinson was hailed as ‘among the most impressive voices of Britain’s younger generation’ by the Irish Times. Robinson is a post-graduate of Lancaster University, where he was awarded a Ph.D. in Creative Writing in 2006. He has appeared at literary festivals around the world, including La Feria Internacional del Libro de Guadalajara, Mexico, and the Edinburgh International Book Festival.
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Sibyl Ruth

Sibyl Ruth‘s first poetry collection, Nothing Personal, was published in 1995 by Iron Press. A chapbook, I Could Become That Woman (Five Leaves), followed in 2003. Her poems have appeared in numerous magazines and anthologies, and have been broadcast on Radio and TV. From 1998-9 she was Birmingham city’s Poet Laureate. In recent years her work has diversified to include both fiction and drama, as well as literary translation and feature journalism. She has taught creative writing for the Open College of the Arts and the University of Birmingham’s Centre for Lifelong Learning. From 2000-2005 she organised the literature programme at mac (the Midlands Arts Centre). She is a member of the editorial advisory panel of Tindal Street Press. Sibyl won first prize in the 2008 Mslexia Poetry Competition.
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Ashley Stokes

Ashley Stokes was born in 1970 in Carshalton, Surrey and was educated at St Anne’s College, Oxford and the University of East Anglia (where he took an MA in Creative Writing). He teaches creative writing at UEA, the Unthank School of Writing and for the OU and is an editor for The Literary Consultancy. His stories have appeared in The Warwick Review, Unthology, Staple, London Magazine, Fleeting Magazine and Fwriction Review among others. He also contributed a chapter to The Creative Writing Coursebook (MacMillan, 2001). He won a 2002 Bridport Short Story Award for The Suspicion of Bones and has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize twice. His first novel,Touching the Starfish was published in 2010 by Unthank Books. A short story collection, The Syllabus of Errors will appear in 2011. His personal website is: www.ashleystokes.net.
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Susannah Waters

Susannah Waters started her professional life as an opera singer, performing principal roles in many of the world’s leading opera houses. Since 2002, she has been a writer and stage director. Her first novel, Long Gone Anybody, was published by Black Swan in 2004, and short-listed for the Pendleton May Award. Her second novel, Cold Comfort, was published by Doubleday in 2006, and featured on Radio 4′s Today programme as one of the first fictional novels dealing with the effects of climate change. She is currently working on her third. In 2003, she founded the multi-art form production company, The Paddock, for whom she frequently devises, commissions and directs work, and whose most recent project was a new site-specific opera by Orlando Gough performed in a disused warehouse. She is an Associate Tutor in Creative Writing at the University of Sussex, as well as a regular tutor for the Arvon Foundation.
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Tessa West

Tessa West initially trained as a teacher, but her interest took a different turn when she began to teach in prisons. This led to her becoming an assistant governor and, later on, an Independent Member of the Parole Board. Her non-fiction book Prisons of Promise was published by Waterside Books. The first creative writing she did was poetry, but she has successfully self-published three novels, The Estuary, The Reed Flute and Companion to Owls. Each of these is set in East Anglia, where she has lived all her adult life. Tessa was one of the first mentors at TLC, work she currently combines with her own writing (she’s well into her fourth novel) and her second year as a student on the MA course Writing the Visual at Norwich University College of the Arts.
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